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20130202
20130202
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the first time since 2009. so as congress agrees to delay a showdown over the debt ceiling and faces a march 1 deadline for across the board spending cuts, what to make of this darned economy, david? >> am i supposed to answer that? it is confusing. the stock market is up. employers are hiring, very slowly. the government now tells us that hey -- they hired a lot more last year than previously believed. auto seafls are up 14% from last year. housing sales are coming back. on the other hand the economy took a pause at the end of last year? unemployment is very high, 7.9%. among men between 25 and 54 one out of six is not working. so i think when you cut through all this what do you see? well, the stock market is going like this and the economy is going like this. that can't last. i can't explain the stock market except maybe there was a gigantic sigh of relief. the republicans aren't going to force the u.s. freshry due default and the europeans aren't going to blow themselves up economically. you see an economy that's growing -- slowly. growing is better than not growing. the europeans are tr
thing he can't avoid is the fiscal situation. there is a lot that has to happen between the debt ceiling and what are we going to do about the receiver? some of the issues he has to face and the large long-run budget that all of us want the policy makers to come together and figure out how we're going to do with it. unfortunately, it has to be front and center to come up with a solution of that. i hone it is. >> i think, first thing to remind ourselves of is that the impact of a president on the short-term economy is almost exaggerated. the president can have a big impact on the economy in the long-run large i will to influencing congress. we look to the white house and say what are you going to do about the economy right now? we have to talk about the jobs report and what is going to happen over the course of the next month. what is so frustrating you know that not much what you're doing does not have a direct link to what is going to happen over the next month. it is interesting about how the debate has shifted. four years ago it was about the short-term situation. now, the economy is
, are we going to shoot ourselves in the foot and not raise the debt ceiling? or not come to an agreement on varies things is one of the main things that can derail us. i'm more nervous about europe than some people. interest rates are down in some of the most troubled countries and their troubles are still there. we still have a risk to the economy. i don't see us heading off to a robust, fast recovery. i think 2013 will be better than 2012. i wish i could tell you that it would be really good because that's what we need. >> i don't call myself an economist. i specialize in economic policy. i try to be a good consumer of other forecasts. one thing i learned from that is frankly i don't trust any macro forecast that goes beyond six months. i don't think -- they are just guessing beyond that. i think we probably -- at least i would have similar reactions. i am still concerned about the risks posed by europe. i'm still quite concerned about the risks from things heating up in the middle east. the u.s. economy is repairing itself. we don't have at significant housing drag that we did a year
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)